Coyote Hunt

sal9000's picture

Dog takes on a deranged coyote.

I forgot to add a description!

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Average: 4 (6 votes)

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Fullauto223cal's picture

Daftcunt isn't going to like this video one bit.

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Bobbob's picture

Yeah, well, I'm a dog lover and I still agree that these need to be taken down. They are pests that go after small game as well as family pets, alike.  The bark at 1:05 surprised me as I initially thought it came from the hunter's dog.  Is this a coyote or a coy-wolf, Fullauto?

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daftcunt's picture

Why would you think that?

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Dude's picture

Because they shot your nephew you stupid mutt :)

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Taintstank's picture

Is that little cunt trying to lure the dog away to where his buddies are waiting?

 

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skeptoid's picture

Yes that's prob exactly what that fuck is trying to do. At 2:30 a.m. one night on the farm a group of them tried to do the same thing with Ziggy. "Hey come out here and check us out. We're not so bad we just want to fool around a little and tease you a little and have a little fun. That's all. I gots some candy in my van. What? Oh those are my friends in the van we're all friends here we all like candy." 

 

Sprinting out into a pitch black field trying to stop my dog from making his last mistake.

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daftcunt's picture

Why do people still strap electric shock collars to their dogs?

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Bobbob's picture

Usually only necessary if the dog is ill trained (or still in training) and not yet obeying verbal commands e.g. to return with/drop retrieved game.

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daftcunt's picture

Anything the dog has not learned can be trained by a competent trainer without these collars. There are very few applications where those may be necessary one of the few exceptions are deaf dogs (using vibrating collars)

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Dude's picture

shouldent deaf dogs not be shot? 

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Bobbob's picture

Not debating how humane those collars are, though they are really low voltage from what I understand, and often are used during training. Just saying that a vibrating collar is not enough of a deterrent when the pupper won't let go of a pheasant. 

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daftcunt's picture

If they don't let go of whatever they have in their mouth the trainer is incompetent. Simple as that.

 

The dog is successfully trained when they want to (Or if they do it "for" the handler although they actually don't want to) drop the prey on queue and not need any adverse stimulus to make them let go.

 

 

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Bobbob's picture

DC, you love animals and advocate for their well being, I get it.  And good on you. But from a practical standpoint, for those folks that don't have your (or Cesar Milan's) patience and resolve as a trainer, I can imagine that this is a quick way to get the dog to come along.  Be glad it exists, my friend.  There are lots of tales (from the old days) of alcohol and testosterone fueled hunters that wasted perfectly good dogs when embarrassed by them on the hunt.  In this case, it may have been a safety precaution, to make sure doggo returned to heel instead of running off to play with his new friends (who appear to have been setting an ambush).

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daftcunt's picture

These collars too often have bad effects when used by "professionals" but can have an even more desastrous effect when used by people that don't know what they are doing (i.e. laymen without patience or resolve), that is one of the reasons why more and more countries are banning them these days. 

 

I think it is fair to stick to simple rules:

 

If people don't have the patience or resolve of a trainer they should not train dogs.

If a dog does not return when called in certain situations you don't let them off the leash in these situations (this principle is called set up to succeed). If the stimulus (or temptation) is too great the e-collar won't work as a deterrent anyway*.

If the dog does not work out to be "good on the hunt" you don't use them for hunting (like you don't force your kid to play the violin despite them not having any talent for it) but give them to someone who just wants a pet. Then you properly train another one that is actually good for the job.

 

Alcolholics and testosterone fuelled dog handlers still exist btw.

 

Cesar Millan is a good role model as far as patience and giving rules is concerned but most definitely not for best practice in implementing these rules or resolving behavioural issues or the weird and unfounded "definitions" in his show ("this is a dominant breed", "he is the dominant one", "the brain moves forward", "snapping them out of it" etc.), especially when laymen "immitate" his work. Most dog trainers worked like this (I also used to) but fortunately many "old schoolers" are changing to modern methods, for some it is hard to let go, though. CM was unable to get a trainers license in Germany and the UK btw.

 

* best example is the virtual fence in combination with e-collars. For most dogs they will work fine but if you have the "wrong" dog they will go after the cat despite the shock, however the collar will later prevent the dog from returning home.

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Dude's picture

That is why you regularly beat your dog with a stick, so he learns like normal ppl

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