Hot Chick Makes Mead

TheWeirdo's picture

Making Mead

Totally trying this shit, man.

No tags?

4.083335
Average: 4.1 (12 votes)

Comments

Critikal's picture
Beta TesterMaster Mind

[@TheWeirdo] No tags. They didn't really add much to the site. The only thing we lost was the related contents thing and not many people used that anyway.

+1
+1
-1
Vote comment up/down
TheWeirdo's picture
Beta Tester

But that chick is hot right?

+1
+1
-1
Vote comment up/down
Critikal's picture
Beta TesterMaster Mind

Whatever floats your boat man

+1
+1
-1
Vote comment up/down
TheWeirdo's picture
Beta Tester

Thank god!

+1
0
-1
Vote comment up/down
pEAGER's picture
Beta Tester

Pro Tips:

1. Don't use chlorine for any sanitation of equipment before fermentation, it leaves a residue that will impart off flavors.  Use some sort of no rinse solution, like starsan or other brewing specific sanitizer.  Her rinse wont remove the residue, and negates the point of her sanitation in the first place.  Not a huge chance of contamination from the tap water, but why risk it?

2. Sanitize your hydrometer, especially if you're only brewing gallon batches.  Two hydrometer readings thrown down the sink is a lot of waste from such a smal batch, and it takes no more effort to sanitize your measuring equipment with the rest of your gear.

3. Aerrate your mixture after your pitch your yeast and add nutrient (nutrient is imporant when making mead/cider/wine).  Yeast require dissolved oxygen during their initial lag phase before fermentation beings, and it helps to mix everything evenly.  Easiest way to achive this, is just shaking the fuck out of your fermentation vessel after you've sealed it up.

4. The % potential alcohol is dependent on your yeast strain.  Some strains fully ferment all available fermentable sugars, while some stop short to increase body of your final product.  The hydrometer reading is simply a measure of your specific gravity of your honey/water mix, which is then compared to another SG reading after fermentation, which will tell you the amount of sugar converted to alcohol (you can use an online calcuator to do the math).  Also, the best way to tell if your fermentation is done is to take two hydrometer readings a few days apart when you suspect your mead is done; if they are the same, then it's finished.

Biggest thing to keep in mind, is that anything that touches your brew after boil/pasturization needs to be sanitized and your mixture needs to be at the right temp before pitching your yeast, the rest just improves the process.  Also, she could have boiled her tap water to both sanitize and boil off the chlorine, which she just added back in when she sanitized with chlorine in the first place.

I brew a lot of beer and cider; never done a mead, but most of the same rules apply.

+1
+1
-1
Vote comment up/down
TheWeirdo's picture
Beta Tester

I just started a batch of mead with a 2 litres mason jar, a small jar of honey and a teaspoon of 1 year expired, and opened, backers yeasts, man.

It's bubbling and has been for a few days.

Smells great, tasted a teaspoon of it and tastes great.

There is a small hint of alcohol.

Now my idea is this : drink it before it stops fermenting.

I never was a wine guy, but if I can get a sparkling mead to about 5-8% alcohol, I'm a happy guy.

Making 2 liters of beer that costs me a 6$ jar of honey, sound like a great deal to me.

 

Edit : a six pack = 2, 046 litres.

Edit 2 : I'm totally trying this shit with a can of maple syrup, man.

+1
0
-1
Vote comment up/down
pEAGER's picture
Beta Tester

If you want to keep it from fermenting fully, stick your jar in the fridge for a couple of days to crash the yeast.  You'll be able to drain off your juice, with most of the extra shit settled at the bottom.  Will taste way better.

+1
0
-1
Vote comment up/down